Review by FinalBoss contributor Kevin Adjei-Darko


Horror legend Stephen King appears to be the gift that keeps on giving as far as Netflix is concerned. The production company just added another title of King’s to its horror catalogue. This time, it is 2012’s In the Tall Grass; a collaboration between King and his son, Joe Hill, which gets the adaptation treatment.

Vincenzo Natali is charged with telling the story of a brother and his pregnant sister who embark on a cross-country trip from Topeka to San Diego in order for her to give up her baby for adoption. However, after making a quick stop to allow his sister to vomit, the duo hears a boy’s cry for help from a field, which begins a recurring nightmare for the characters. After they head in to rescue the boy, they eventually have to come to terms with the possibility they might be stuck in the field for the foreseeable future.  Chaos ensues when the situation goes from bad to worse to horrifyingly creepy, even making way for some time travel!

Who’s In In The Tall Grass?

The film stars Patrick Wilson (Insidious, The Conjuring, Annabelle Goes Home) as a father in search of his son who gets lost in the tall grass, Avery Whitted as the over-protective brother and Rachel Wilson (Saw 3D, Hellions), who plays the pregnant sister. It also stars William Buie Jr., and Australian actor Harrison Gilbertson.

What We Should Know About In A Tall Grass

Natali wastes no time presenting the suspense, which is sure to keep fans of the horror genre entertained. As other characters are introduced, it becomes terrifyingly obvious that all is not as it seems as the field seems to have a life of its own.

Natali’s vision is brought to life by lush camera work; which includes stunning overhead shots and creative transitions, which drives the story. This is made the more stirring with clean and apt editing.

Horror darling, Patrick Wilson contributes an intense and somewhat comical performance accompanied by a haunting score consisting of ritualistic jungle chants and drums. The real MVP in the acting department however, proves to be Will Buie Jr., who stirs up a range of emotions from anger to compassion in the role of Tobin.   

Horror enthusiasts expecting a quick payoff might be in for a level of frustration as clocking in at one hour and forty-one minutes, it might seem to be just a tad too long and drawn out. Ironic considering its wiry base material. It does, however make up for this with scares, twists and turns, with a theme of betrayal, trust, and a somewhat insinuation at incest.

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